Nosocomial diseases are infectious diseases that are obtained in a hospital (or related) setting. The most common type of nosocomial infection is a urinary tract infection (UTI) associated with catheters. A catheter is a hollow tube apparatus that is inserted up the urethra of the urinary tract into the otherwise sterile urinary bladder. It is used to eliminate urine in people who have lost (either permanently or temporarily) the ability to void urine. Why are UTIs and catheters so often associated?

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    Improper handling of the catheters contaminates them and they become conduits for bacteria from the outside to the inside, thereby bypassing the host defenses such as skin and mucous membranes.
    The catheters cause injury to the mucous membrane of the urethra, making the tissue very susceptible to inflammation.
    The insertion of the catheter produces small breaks in blood vessels lining the urethral membrane, allowing bacteria from the blood to enter the urethra and eventually the urinary bladder.
    The catheters are not sterilely packaged. Bacteria on the catheters then ascend up the urethra to the bladder.

asked May 30, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

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Improper handling of the catheters contaminates them and they become conduits for bacteria from the outside to the inside, thereby bypassing the host defenses such as skin and mucous membranes.
answered May 31, 2013 by Bioshare ~Top Expert~ (34,070 points)

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