When oxygen and carbon dioxide are carried in the blood, very little is carried in the plasma in a dissolved form. How does this help facilitate gas exchange at the lungs and tissues?

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    The gases travel faster when they are bound to hemoglobin.
    By competing for hemoglobin, the carbon dioxide can force the oxygen into the tissues. At the lungs, the oxygen forces the carbon dioxide off of this molecule so that it can be released into the air.
    This helps the blood pull oxygen into the blood from the air and carbon dioxide into the blood from the tissues.
    By removing the oxygen and carbon dioxide from solution in the plasma, a gradient for these gases can be maintained to favor diffusion.

asked May 30, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

1 Answer

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By removing the oxygen and carbon dioxide from solution in the plasma, a gradient for these gases can be maintained to favor diffusion.
answered May 31, 2013 by Bioshare ~Top Expert~ (34,070 points)

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