Fish do not maintain whole-body temperatures different from the temperature of the water in which they live. However, many fish, if given a choice of water temperatures from which to choose (say, in an experimental aquarium that offers a gradient of water temperatures), will select a narrow range of water temperatures in which to live. Thus, they exhibit a

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Does this represent true homeostasis in the fullest sense of the term? Justify your answer.
    Yes. This qualifies as homeostasis because body temperature is actively regulated such that internal physiological variables are kept within the range that cells need to function.
    No. This does not qualify as homeostasis because homeostasis involves the control of a physiological variable within very narrow limits so that cells can function. The body temperature of a fish fluctuates with the temperature of the external environment.
    Yes. This qualifies as homeostasis because a constant body temperature is maintained.
    No. This does not qualify as homeostasis because, even though the fish are maintaining relatively constant internal conditions, they are not using a feedback system in order to maintain these conditions.

asked May 30, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

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Yes. This qualifies as homeostasis because body temperature is actively regulated such that internal physiological variables are kept within the range that cells need to function.
answered May 31, 2013 by Bioshare ~Top Expert~ (34,070 points)

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