The peppered moth...

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The peppered moth provides a well-known example of natural selection. The light-colored form of the moth was predominant in England before the industrial revolution. In the mid-nineteenth century, a dark-colored form appeared. The difference is produced by a dominant allele of one gene. By about 1900, approximately 90% of the moths around industrial areas were dark colored, whereas light-colored moths were still abundant elsewhere. Apparently, birds could readily find the light moths against the soot-darkened background in industrial areas and therefore were eating more light moths. Recently, use of cleaner fuels has greatly reduced soot in the landscape, and the dark-colored moths have been disappearing. Should the two forms of moths be considered separate species?

  1. Yes, because natural selection has affected the frequency of the two different forms.
  2. Yes, because they have completely different coloration.
  3. Yes, because they are reproductively isolated based on habitat.
  4. Yes, because they have completely different coloration and natural selection has affected the frequency of the two different forms.
  5. No.
asked Apr 20, 2012 in Biology by Kist Nus ~Expert~ (641 points)
retagged Apr 20, 2012 by pokemonmaster
    

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Answer : No

Confirmed Right.
answered Apr 21, 2012 by Kist Nus ~Expert~ (641 points)

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