At the beginning of most recipes for bread, you are instructed to dissolve the yeast in a mixture of sugar (sucrose) and hot water, in some cases with a small amount of flour. Within a short time, this yeast mixture begins to bubble and foam, perhaps to the point of overflowing the container. What is happening?

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    The bubbles are water vapor produced as the hot water evaporates.
    The bubbles are carbon dioxide that yeast produce as they break down the glucose and produce ATP via fermentation.
    The bubbles are detergents that yeast produce to help them digest the proteins in the flour.
    The bubbles are oxygen produced by yeast as they grow.

asked May 30, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

1 Answer

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The bubbles are carbon dioxide that yeast produce as they break down the glucose and produce ATP via fermentation.
answered May 31, 2013 by Bioshare ~Top Expert~ (34,070 points)

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