A scientist studying photosynthesis illuminated a culture of algae with bright visible light. She then turned out the light and simultaneously began to bubble radioactive CO2 gas into the culture. After 30 minutes, she stopped the reaction and measured the amount of radioactivity inside the cells. What did she find? Explain your answer.

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    There was radioactivity in the cells, because the CO2 is used to synthesize sugar, even in the dark.
    There was no radioactivity in the cells, because light is required to produce sugars from CO2 and water.
    There was no radioactivity inside the cells, because the CO2 is used to produce O2 in the light-dependent reactions. Thus, there was radioactivity in the air above the culture but not in the cells.
    There was radioactivity inside the cells, because CO2 is used to replace the electrons that were lost by chlorophyll when the lights were turned on.

asked May 30, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

1 Answer

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There was radioactivity in the cells, because the CO2 is used to synthesize sugar, even in the dark.
answered May 31, 2013 by Bioshare ~Top Expert~ (34,070 points)

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