Benzer used mutagenesis of RII to generate various types of mutations that could be studied by deletion mapping. He observed two types of mutants: some that were revertible, and some that were nonrevertible. Why are some mutations able to revert back to wild-type but others are permanent mutations?

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Revertible mutations are caused by DNA base-sequence substitutions (point mutations), whereas nonrevertible mutations are partial deletion mutations, in which part of the gene sequence is lost.

Revertible mutations occur within noncoding regions, whereas nonrevertible mutations occur within exons.

Revertible mutations are caused by temporary gene silencing through siRNAs, but nonrevertible mutations are created by permanent deletions of coding regions in the genes.

Revertible mutations occur on only one copy of the gene, whereas nonrevertible mutations occur on both copies of a chromosome in a diploid organism.

 

asked May 13, 2013 in Genetics by GeneX ~Top Expert~ (7,947 points)
    

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Revertible mutations are caused by DNA base-sequence substitutions (point mutations), whereas nonrevertible mutations are partial deletion mutations, in which part of the gene sequence is lost.

 

answered May 13, 2013 by GeneX ~Top Expert~ (7,947 points)

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