What is the phase angle between the current and the applied voltage?

+2 votes

An RLC circuit consists of a 180 image resistor, a 21.0 µF capacitor, and a 400 mH inductor, connected in series with a 120 V, 60.0 Hz power supply.

(a)What is the phase angle between the current and the applied voltage? 
 ° 
(b)Which reaches its maximum earlier, the current or the voltage?
    

 

asked Mar 19, 2012 in Physics by apush ~Expert~ (552 points)
    

2 Answers

0 votes

The phase angle is the angle between the current and voltage.

This is found by using the following formula:

 

Phase angle = inverse tangent( (XL - XC )/ R)     (*where XL = inductive reactance, XC = capacitive reactance)

 

So first we need to find XL and XC :

XL = ω*L      (*where ω = angular frequency, L = inductance)

XC = 1 / ω*C     (*where ω = angular frequency, C = capacitance)

and ω is equal to:

ω = 2*pi*f    (*where f = frequency in Hz)

 

After finding XL and XC, plug back into first equation fo find teh phase angle

 

Part B:

If XL > XC then Voltage leads,  if XL < XC then Current leads, if they're equal then the phase angle is 0.

answered Mar 25, 2012 by kirby ~Expert~ (3,020 points)
0 votes
first answer is angle 7.7 second answer is volage
answered May 1, 2013 by anonymous

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