John Dalton, an eighteenth-century chemist, spent time working on the cause of color blindness, which he and his brother both experienced. To both men, red and green appeared to be the same color. Dalton incorrectly hypothesized that the problem was in the color of the fluid that filled his eye. We now know that he was missing cones that are important for telling the difference between red and green light. How do we know that Dalton had a normal amount of S opsin cones?

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S opsin cones absorb blue light, and Dalton's problem was with the colors red and green.

  

S opsin cones reflect red light, and Dalton could not see red objects.

  

S opsin cones reflect blue light, and Dalton could see blue objects.

  

S opsin cones absorb red light, and Dalton's problem was with the colors red and green.

 

asked Jan 1, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

1 Answer

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S opsin cones absorb blue light, and Dalton's problem was with the colors red and green.

 

answered Jan 1, 2013 by anonymous

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