When sound waves enter the mammalian ear, they cause the tympanic membrane to vibrate. How is the middle ear involved in the delivery of these vibrations to the oval window, which separates the middle ear from the inner ear?

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The ear ossicles in the middle ear produce electrical signals that help to amplify the sound waves as they are transmitted to the oval window.

Ossicles in the middle ear help to dampen sound waves to prevent them from damaging the inner ear.

The lever action of the ossicles in the middle ear and the much smaller size of the oval window compared to the tympanic membrane help to amplify sound waves, so that they stimulate the inner ear.

The middle ear is not directly involved in the delivery of these vibrations, but its length and the presence of ossicles reduce their frequency to regulate their arrival at the oval window.

 

asked Jan 1, 2013 in Biology by anonymous
    

1 Answer

0 votes

 

The lever action of the ossicles in the middle ear and the much smaller size of the oval window compared to the tympanic membrane help to amplify sound waves, so that they stimulate the inner ear.

 

answered Jan 1, 2013 by anonymous



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