In the study of Anolis lizards that colonized various Caribbean islands, similar habitats and ecological types were found on Hispaniola and Jamaica. What observation suggest that adaptive radiations occur in response to habitat availability and the absence of competitors?

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The first colonists on every island were always the same species, a twig-dwelling specialist. However, in every case, that species gave rise to the same set of other species that specialized on different habitats. The phylogeny for each island had the same root and the same pattern of speciation.

Each island was colonized by a different species initially, and that species underwent a radiation, giving rise to new species that occupied different habitat types. There was no similarity, however, in the adaptations from one island to another. The phylogeny for each island was completely unique and totally unlike that of any other island.

Different islands were initially colonized by different species that differed in habitat preference, but in both cases subsequent speciation produced a range of ecological specialists occupying similar habitat niches. The phylogeny for each island was unique, but species evolved having similar sets of adaptations for each habitat.

Each island was initially colonized by a different species that occupied its preferred habitat. Subsequent colonizing species were successful only if they could use an unoccupied habitat type. The phylogeny for each island was the same throughout the region because no evolution occurred, only colonization.

 

asked Dec 28, 2012 in Biology by anonymous
    

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Different islands were initially colonized by different species that differed in habitat preference, but in both cases subsequent speciation produced a range of ecological specialists occupying similar habitat niches. The phylogeny for each island was unique, but species evolved having similar sets of adaptations for each habitat.

 

answered Dec 28, 2012 by anonymous

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