How do I integrate e^5x?

+2 votes
asked Oct 13, 2011 in Calculus 1 by Joey33 ~Expert~ (1,216 points)
    

2 Answers

+6 votes
 
Best answer
The above answer is correct, however it is not simplified... to integrate e^5x, use a u-substitution, and make u=5x, then du = 5 dx, and so dx = u* 1/5, plugging this back into the integral you get, 1/5 * e^u du.  Move your 1/5 out of the integral and just integrate e^u, which is simply e^u + constant,  don't forget the 1/5 that you moved to the front, and now you have (1/5)e^u + C,  now plug back in your 5x for u and you get, (1/5) e^5x + C as your final answer.
answered Oct 14, 2011 by pokemonmaster ~Expert~ (3,856 points)
edited Oct 14, 2011 by SiteAdmin
Same answer just another step to do....
–1 vote

 

Steps:
 
integral e^(5 x) dx

The integral of e^(5 x) is e^(5 x)/(5 log(e)):
 
= e^(5 x)/(5 log(e))+c




answered Oct 14, 2011 by Mcats01 (62 points)

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