Suppose an X-ray burst briefly increases the observed luminosity of a star by 6 magnitudes as detected in a certain instrument. How much farther away could it be detected than other similar stars that are barely observable in the same instrument?

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    The X-ray burster would have to be about 4 times closer than other similar stars that were not bursting.
     The X-ray burster would be detectable nearly 100 times farther away than other similar stars that were not bursting.
     The X-ray burster would be detectable nearly 16 times farther away than other similar stars that were not bursting.
     The X-ray burster would have to be nearly 16 times closer than other similar stars that were not bursting.
     The X-ray burster would be detectable nearly 4 times farther away than other similar stars that were not bursting.
asked Sep 20, 2012 in Astronomy by anonymous
    

1 Answer

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The X-ray burster would be detectable nearly 16 times farther away than other similar stars that were not bursting.
answered Sep 22, 2012 by SkyStar ~Expert~ (2,855 points)



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